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c\c^feCoe*tN 



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page: 



C 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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020 534 932 7 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




Ml Hill IIIII 1 II llll 




020 534 933 9 



Box Number 



32M 



Total of 
Volumes 



323 



3>8B 



l&G 



Call Number 






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NATIONAL MONUMENT 

California 



THE 1949 AND 1950 ERUPTIONS 
OF MAUNA LOA 

HAWAII NATIONAL PARK 

The 1949 eruption of Mauna Loa began late on the after- 
noon of January 6. Lava broke out along a series of fissures 
which crossed Mokuaweoweo caldera and extended 1.7 
miles down the southwest rift. During the opening hours 
of activity a flow extended 6 miles down the western flank 
of the mountain. Within 48 hours, however, all activity 
outside the caldera was over and the western flow was dead. 
Within 3 days, activity was entirely confined to the south- 
western edge of the caldera. Lava fountains spurting from 
the fissure grew gradually higher, until on January 23 they 
were reaching heights as great as 800 feet. A cone of 
pumice 1,500 feet across and 250 feet high was built, and 
a mile-long blanket of pumice extended leeward of the 
cone. More than half the caldera floor was flooded with 
new lava. South Pit, a pit crater adjoining Mokuaweoweo, 
was filled to overflowing with lava, which spilled out to 
form a flow 4 miles long on the southern flank of the moun- 
tain. Lava fountaining came to an end on February 5, but 
short periods of quiet overflow of lava occurred during 
February and March, and during April it became almost 
continuous. A small lava cone was built on the caldera 
floor east of the earlier cone, and much of the southern part 
of the caldera was again flooded with lava. The eruption 
ended late in May. 

On June 1, 1950, almost exactly 1 year after the end of 
the 1949 eruption, Mauna Loa again broke into activity. 



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Open -Aft y ear *f *f 




Rocky 
Mountain 



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i lational J-^ark 

COLORADO 




urns 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



New Mexico 







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(Canyon de Chelly 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 



ARIZONA 



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1 



Jefferson National Expansion Memorial 



ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 







JOSfiUA 
TREE 




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MONUMENTOS HISTORICOS NACIONALES de 




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JTIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 

New York 




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XBRILLO 
J NATIONAL MONUMENT 



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CALIFORNIA 







MOUNTAIN 









NATIONAL MONUMENT 

New Mexico 



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CEDAR BREAKS 

National Monument • Uta 





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Situated high ON the Markagunt Pla- 
teau in southwest Utah at elevations 
reaching 10,700 feet, Cedar Breaks National 
Monument contains a gigantic multicolored 
natural amphitheater. The Pink Cliffs, a 
part of the Wasatch formation, have a thick- 
ness here of nearly 2,000 feet. They ex- 
hibit fantastic erosional features and display 
an amazing variety of color, 47 different 
shades having been recognized. With ever- 
changing tints of the vividly colored rock 
formations, sweeping vistas, and attractive 
wildflowers, Cedar Breaks National Monu- 
ment offers superlative scenic values. One 
of the most spectacular views is from nearby 
Brianhead, which has an elevation of 11,315 
feet. 

The monument is located 21 miles east of 
Cedar City, Utah, and is surrounded by 



Dixie National Forest. It embraces an area 
of 6,172.20 acres, two-thirds of which con- 
sist of high cliffs and steep talus slopes. 

Since cedar trees are not evident in the 
area, the name "Cedar Breaks" is confusing 
to many visitors. Junipers, which the early 
settlers called "cedars," grow nearby, but at 
elevations considerably below the rim of the 
amphitheater. The settlers also referred to 
the canyons and cliffs as "breaks" or "bad- 
lands." 

HISTORY 

Early exploration of the Markagunt Pla- 
teau began in 1851 when the Mormons 
settled in Parowan and Cedar City, in the 
valley to the west. In 1852, church leaders 
explored the headwaters of the Sevier and 



Photo: Amphitheater from Point Supreme (Courtesy, Union Pacific RR.) 






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T)eath %Jalley 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



CALIFORNIA 



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NEVADA 









NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 
NEW YORK CITY 






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Fort T) one Is on * ^ 

NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 




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General Grant. 




N N E S S E 



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FORT 
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National Monument . 



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NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 

Colorado 




NATIONAL MONUMENT • NEVADA 






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National Historical Park 

NEW JERSEY 



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MOUNT 



RUSHMORE 




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National NLemorial 

SOUTH DAKOTA 



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SHILOH 



National 
Military 
Park 



TENNESSEE 




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National Military Park * 

MISSISSIPPI 



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IsleRoyale ' 

National Park Michigan 



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MEMORIAL 



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A Part of Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia 



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NATIONAL MONUME NfX!^ 2z 




ARIZONA 




NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZpNA 



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Fort Matanzas 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 



FLORIDA 




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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



NEW MEXICO 



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Guilford Courthouse 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



North Carolina 




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KENNESAW MOUNTAIN 

National Battlefield Park and the Atlanta Campaign 







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4 NOV 9 



1 ^37 



Seeing 

General Grant Grove 



KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK 



General grant grove once was a part of the most exten- 
sive of all giant sequoia forests. Of the original forest, 
little more than this 4-square-mile area was saved from lum- 
bering when it became a national park in 1890. The Gen- 
eral Grant Tree was discovered in 1862 by Joseph Hardin 
Thomas, and named in 1867 by Mrs. Lucretia P. Baker. 
For 50 years this area was known as General Grant National 
Park. The act establishing Kings Canyon National Park in 
1940 made General Grant Grove a part of that park. The 
area containing the magnificent Redwood Mountain Grove 
was added a short time later. Today, the centrally located 
General Grant Grove serves as an excellent base for drives 
into Kings Canyon, along the Generals Highway to Giant 
Forest, or for back-country trail trips. Y- F 1 fif\ 



About the Giant Sequoias 



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These largest of living things are so well proportioned, 
and display such symmetry and balance, that often it is diffi- 
cult to appreciate their true size. Members of a genus that 
in the geologic past populated much of the northern hem- 
isphere, this species now is found in separated groves only 
along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. Another 
species, the coast redwood, grows near the coast in central 
and northern California. 

After you have studied these trees for size, meditated on 
their great age, and enjoyed their beauty of color and form, 
other features will be noticed. 

A mixed forest. Growing in association with the giant 
sequoia in General Grant Grove are the magnificent sugar 
and ponderosa pines, along with white fir and incense-cedar. 

Seeds and cones. The egg-shaped, thick-scaled, rather 
small cone produces many seeds. 

Young sequoias. The seeds germinate only in exposed 
mineral soil in open places, not in the shaded forest. Look 
for young trees near General Grant Tree, along the highway, 
and in General Grant Village. 

The crowns. Young sequoias are sharp spires in sil- '' 
houette, with dense foliage down to ground level. In early 
maturity, the lower branches are lost. Later, most of the 
upper branches drop away, leaving a few to grow larger, 
branch out, and lift up. These form the typical domelike 
crown of older trees. 

Snag tops. Severe injury to the base may cause dead 
tops. 

Fire scars. Repeated lightning fires caused these black 
scars and hollows. Fire rarely kills the larger trees, because 
they are protected by thick, fire-resistant bark. 



The National Park System, of which this park is a unit, is 
dedicated to conserving the scenic, scientific, and historic 
heritage of the United States for the benefit and enjoyment 
of its people. 








4 JAN 24 
Co» 1957 

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NATIONAL CAPITAL 

PARKS 



SYSTEM 






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SEQUOIA l^ATIOJNfcALJPARK 

X-E160 



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Giant Forest was discovered in 1858 by pioneef Hale 
Tharp, and named by John Muir. When logging opera- 
tions threatened many sequoia groves, organizations and 
individuals purchased some of the finest lands and donated 
them to the Federal Government. In 1890, Sequoia National 
Park was established, the second unit of today's National 
Park System. 

At first the park included the sequoia groves, and extended 
only to about the Great Western Divide. Later the wilder- 
ness of the Kern Canyon and Mount Whitney was added to 
the park. Today extensive trails open up a true mountain 
wilderness of towering peaks and profound canyons. 



About the Sequoias 

At first you may not realize the gigantic size of the se- 
quoias. Beauty of color and form, stateliness, majesty, bal- 
ance and harmony, or the pervading quietness of the forests 
may impress you most. Then, as you observe individual 
trees more closely, other special features excite your curiosity. 

A mixed forest. Note that the sugar pine, ponderosa 
pine, white fir, and incense-cedar grow in the same forest 
with the giant sequoia. 

Cone and seed. Astonishingly small seeds are borne 
in small, hard, thick-scaled, egg-shaped cones, which may 
cling tenaciously to the tree for years, if not cut down by 
squirrels. 

Young sequoias. Look for them in open places, such 
as along roadsides and in the lodge and museum grounds, 
as the seeds germinate in exposed mineral soil. 

Compare the crowns. Young and the early mature 
sequoias are perfect sharp spires with numerous branches 
down to ground level. As the tree grows taller, the lower 
branches slough away, but the spire top remains. Later, 
Nature prunes out most upper branches, and the remaining 
ones expand and become many-branched to form the rounded 
or domelike crown. 



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Dead crowns. Sometimes these result 
nourishment following severe base injury. 

Fire scars. Lightning-caused forest fires, occurring as 
much as 250 years or more apart, produced these injuries. 

Death of a giant. Sequoias resist insects and rot. 
Rarely are they killed by fire or lightning. It is said that 
the "giant sequoia never dies on its feet." When the 
ground beneath is softened or eroded, death comes when 
the tree loses balance and crashes. 



The National Park System, of which this park is a unit, is 
dedicated to conserving the scenic, scientific, and historic 
heritage of the United States for the benefit and enjoyment 
of its people. 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT- ARIZONA 



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NATIONAL MEMORIAL 

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NORTH CAROLINA 




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NATIONAL PARK 

Wyoming 
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(MAP OF PARK INSIDE) 



FOR YOUR SAFETY 



While in geyser or hot sprites areas, STAY ON CON- 
STRUCTED WALKS AND KEEP YOUR CHILDREN ON 
THEM. A fall into a boiling pool is fatal; in many places, 
ground crust that looks safe and solid is thin — dangerous to 
walk on. 

BEARS, DEER, AND OTHER LARGE ANIMALS ARE 
POTENTIALLY VERY DANGEROUS. OBSERVE THEM 
FROM A DISTANCE, DO NOT FEED THEM. 



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PUBLIC USE 

TABULATION OP VISITORS 

TO AREAS ADMINISTERED BY THE 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 




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UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OP THE INTERIOR 

SEPTEMBER, 1957 , 



X-E160 
THE U6 

NATIONAL PARK ^™ 
SYSTEM 



WESTERN 
UNITED STATES 




AN INVITATION 



The national park service of the Department of 
the Interior invites you to the areas of the National 
Park System, which are the property of all Americans. 
It urges you, when you visit them, co take advantage 
of the opportunities offered to learn more about them; 
and it asks your assistance in protecting the natural 
and historic features found in them. 



Revistd 1937 






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NATIONAL PARK • UTAH 






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CALIFORNIA 



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Capulin Mountain 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 

NEW MEXICO 



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THE CHERRY BLOSSOMS 

WASHINGTON, DC. 




4-iVIAK 

Copy ,.1957 





DEATH VALLEY 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



CALIFORNIA 



NEVADA 




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DEATH VALLEY 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



CALIFORNIA 



NEVADA 



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DEATH VALLEY 

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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



CALIFORNIA 




NEVAD^ DEC16 
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DEATH VALLEY 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 

CALIFORNIA NEVADlW, 




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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



CALIFORNIA 



NEV. 








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DINOSAUR 



National 
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National 
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DINOSAUR 

National 
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LABORATORY 








NATIONAL MONUMENT 




WEST ORANGE, New Jersey 



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EDISON 



LABORATORY 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 




WEST ORANGE, New Jersey 






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EDISON 




LABORATORY 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 




WEST ORANGE, New Jersey 



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EDISON 



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LABORATORY 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 




WEST ORANGE, New Jersey 



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El Morro 



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FORT 
LARAMIE 



National Monument . . . WYOMING 



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Fort 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 



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WASHINGTON 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 







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THE 



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[foHT-~ .lSS7| 

Franklin D. Roosevelt Library 



HYDE PARK, NEW YORK 



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Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania 



NATIONAL 

MILITARY 

PARK 

Virginia 4 




T-l I'll 

rreaericksburg an 



NATIONAL 

MILITARY 

PARK 

Virginia 




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4 JAN 2* 



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Birthplace 

NATIONAL MONUMENT 
VIRGINIA 




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George Ifflaminjgton Birtnplace U6 
Rational IvtontJiment 




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George Washington 

CARVER 



NATIONAL MONUMENT • MISSOURI 




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NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 




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ATIONAL 
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Canyon 



NATIONAL PARK 




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Grand Teton 




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Grand Teton 




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October, 1957 

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS 
NATIONAL PARK 

TENNESSEE — NORTH CAROLINA 



NATURALIST SERVICE 

By means of guided hiking trips, illustrated talks, informal' campfire talks, 
and exhibits, it is aimed to make the visitor better acquainted with the natural 
and human history of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. ' On the longer 
hikes, areas of outstanding scenic interest are visited. Regardless bf the objective, 
stops are made at frequent intervals and trailside features are discussed. Hikers 
should wear comfortable shoes and heavy socks. Unless indicated, no registration 
is necessary. Regardless of where they are held, all talks and trips are open to 
the public and are offered without charge by the National Park Service. 

Don't fail to visit the Pioneer Exhibits Area, two miles north of Cherokee, 
North Carolina, along US 441, in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Open 
daily and Sundays from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 






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-OCT 21 



X-E160 
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Guilford Courthouse 






NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



North Carolina 




Guilford 



4 -SEP A » I .U 

courthouse 



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.116 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 



North Carolina 




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< NOV 13 1957 

C°Py-- 1957J ^ /c3 



Guilford Courthouse 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 
North Carolina 



X-E160 
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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

X-E160 

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HAWAII NATIONAL PARK 




4 -MAR $ 

Cop* 19W 



A Guide for the 

Haleakala Section 

Island of Alaui, Hawaii 
George C. Ruhle and Eugene J. Barton 



*|8««4<. 




S Ocik^° 



A service to you bythe Hawaii Natural History Association that you may have greater 
appreciation through better understanding. 



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HARPERS FERRY 



NATIONAL 




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IsleRoyale 

National Park Michigan 

X-E160 




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Isle Royale 

National Park Michigan 





THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE €QOPERATj#G. FITH THE 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES 




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THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE COOPERATING. ^ ITH THE 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQUITIES' 



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THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE COOPERATING yiTH THE ȣ_.. .. 
ASSOCIATION FOR THE PRESERVATION OF VIRGINIA ANTIQL4TIES 




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CRESCENT MEADOW 




SELF-GUIDING 
AUTO TOUR 



Crescent Meadow 



SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK 



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NATIONAL PARK 

Washington 




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NATIONAL MONUMENT 

California Ml?p 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 

x-r-tco California 




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lONAL MONUMENT 

California #'^ 




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TONAL MONUMENT 






California # '^ 



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PARKWAY 

TENNESSEE . ALABAMA • MISSISSIPPI 




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NATIONAL PARK 




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Petrified Forest 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT • ARIZONA 



VWy^k^'fr 







The Removal of Petrified Wood from the Monument is Prohibited by Law 




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PINNACLES 



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National Monument " 




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National Monument 





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Prince William 
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NATIONAL PARKS 
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NATIONAL PARKS 
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TRAIL GUIDE 

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SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK 

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Shenandoah 



NATIONAL PARK 




VIRGINIA 

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Theodore Roosevelt 



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NORTH DAKOTA 



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ST. JOHN ISLAND, V. I. 



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YELLOWSTONE 

NATIONAL PARK 



Wyoming • Montana • Idaho 

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FOR YOUR SAFETY 



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While in geyser or hot springs areas, Stay on Con- 
structed Walks and Keep Your Children on Them, 
A fall into a boiling pool is fatal; in many places, ground 
crust that looks safe and solid is thin— dangerous to 
walk on. 

Bears, Deer, and Other Large Animals Are Potentially 
Very Dangerous. Observe Them From a Distance; Do 
Not Feed Them. 



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National Park 

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National Park 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 



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NEW MEXICO 



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OCT 271958 

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NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 

NEBRASKA 

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NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 

NEBRASKA 




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VIRGINIA 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 




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KENTUCKY • VIRGINIA • TENNESSEE 







DEATH VALLEY 

NATIONAL MONUMENT $\<\£ 



CALIFORNIA 



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EVERGLADES 

X-E NATIONAL PARK 

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Florida 



MAY 14 1958 
Copy 1358 



everglades national park at the southern tip of the 
Florida peninsula was established in 1947. The park con- 
tains more than 2,300 square miles of land and water. 
Strong tropical influences make this one of the most unusual 
wilderness areas in the United States. Warmed by the sun 
and nourished by the waters, the biologically fertile area 
supports many interrelated forms of plant and animal life 
under natural conditions. 

The park naturalist and his staff conduct programs and 
walks designed to give you a better understanding of the 
wildlife, geology, plants, and history of the Everglades 
country. You will certainly want to take advantage of the 
free naturalist service provided at Royal Palm Station and 
at Flamingo during the winter season. 

Guided boat trips will take you into the fascinating back- 
country areas of the park and usually last from U/ 2 to 2 
hours. You may obtain schedules fox these trips at park 
headquarters, at Flamingo, at all ranger stations, and at 
many of the nearby tourist places. 

OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS, PICNICKING, 
AND CAMPING 

Only limited overnight accommodations are available in 
the park. For this reason you should make your reserva- 
tions well ahead of your visit to the park in order to insure 
that you will have a place to stay. Make reservations by 
writing the Everglades Park Co., Inc., either at Flamingo, 
Fla., or at 2980 Coral Way, Miami 34, Fla. Also, you may 
telephone the same company at Everglades, Fla., OXford 
5-2521, or Miami, Highland 6-1590. 

Two areas in the park are designated for picnicking: 
Royal Palm Station and Flamingo. However, there are no 
fireplaces and open fires are not permitted. 

You may enjoy camping at an improved campground at 
Flamingo The space is limited and must be occupied on 
a first-come first-served basis. Camping in the back coun- 
try is permitted, but you must obtain a campfire permit at 
park headquarters or at any ranger station. 




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EVERGLAD 

NATIONAL PARK 

Florida %-£.\5Q 

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everglades national park at the southern tip of the 
Florida peninsula was established in 1947. The park con- 
tains more than 2,300 square miles of land and water. 
Strong tropical influences make this one of the most unusual 
wilderness areas in the United States. Warmed by the sun 
and nourished by the waters, the biologically fertile area 
supports many interrelated forms of plant and animal life 
under natural conditions. 

The park naturalist and his staff conduct programs and 
walks designed to give you a better understanding of the 
wildlife, geology, plants, and history of the Everglades 
country. You will certainly want to take advantage of the 
free naturalist service provided at Royal Palm Station and 
at Flamingo during the winter season. 

Guided boat trips will take you into the fascinating back- 
country areas of the park and usually last from ll/ 2 to 2 
hours. You may obtain schedules for these trips at park 
headquarters, at Flamingo, at all ranger stations, and at 
many of the nearby tourist places. 

OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS, PICNICKING, 
AND CAMPING 

Only limited overnight accommodations are available in 
the park. For this reason you should make your reserva- 
tions well ahead of your visit to the park in order to insure 
that you will have a place to stay. Make reservations by 
writing the Everglades Park Co., Inc., either at Flamingo, 
Fla., or at 2980 Coral Way, Miami 34, Fla. Also, you may 
telephone the same company at Everglades, Fla., OXford 
5-2521, or Miami, Highland 6-1590. 

Two areas in the park are designated for picnicking: 
Royal Palm Station and Flamingo. However, there are no 
fireplaces and open fires are not permitted. 

You may enjoy camping at an improved campground at 
Flamingo. The space is limited and must be occupied on 
a first-come first-served basis. Camping in the back coun- 
try is permitted, but you must obtain a campfire permit at 
park headquarters or at any ranger station. 



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Fort Caroline 



NATIONAL MEMORIAL 

Florida 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 
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